Who We Are

About Jennifer Wade Culture Consulting

Jen Wade Consulting is focused on helping leaders build a participating all-encompassing workplace culture of equality and engagement. We accentuate commitment to a communication process of employee awareness, and a safe work environment built on trust and clarity. Our strategy targets organizational strengths and works with individuals to build strong habits and bonds. We cultivate resiliency, integrity, and teamwork. We mentor teams on matters of diversity and inclusion. We are passionate in our belief that organizational culture drives the day to day operation as well as people, performance, and proficiency to eliminate the pain of profit loss.

About Jennifer

Jennifer is a Veteran with over thirty years of service to the United States Military. After leaving the military she worked for the Missouri government in, the Department of Labor’s Workforce Development Veterans’ Employment Program. She has experience in areas of human resources, benefits and compensation, facilitative learning, training development, operational management, team building, conflict management, sensing sessions, diversity, and inclusive leadership.

Jennifer holds a Masters’ Degree from the University of Louisville, School of Education in Human Resources and Organizational Development. In addition, she received her Bachelors’ Degree in Sociology from Saint Leo University. While in the military she completed both certificates in Basic and Advanced Leadership Development Training.

Licensed Consultant logo ®-01

CultureWise™ Licensed Consultant

Empower. Inspire.
Succeed.

Empower. Inspire.
Succeed.

Can You Fix A Toxic Culture Without Firing People?

  1. When is calling a culture “toxic” appropriate? How bad do things need to be to earn that label?
  2. Gallup’s 2017 State of the Global Workplace report found that 67% of employees are “not engaged” and 18% are “actively disengaged” at work.
  3. Downsizing a workforce by 1% leads to a 31% increase in voluntary turn over the next year.
  4. Studies show that when employees feel valued by their companies, they are more committed and satisfied in their jobs and show fewer signs of stress and burnout.

We have reached a cultural tipping point in the workplace, driven by public attitude shifts on employment policies, blurred lines between work and home life, and generational differences in the expectations of work itself. It is no longer “enough” for employers to satisfy customers or appease shareholders; they must also become and remain good corporate citizens. Nowhere is it more important for employers to be good citizens than in the workplace itself, and there is no greater lever than the relationship between “People Managers” and their employees.

Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.

President and CEO, SHRM